DUNDEE DESIGNER TO CREATE A DYSLEXIC FRIENDLY SIZING CHART TO BE USED WORLDWIDE    

Dundee independent, sustainable designer Deborah Breen of Wilde Mode plans to create a dyslexia friendly sizing chart for users worldwide ahead of World Dyslexia Awareness Day (Thursday 7th October). 

The standardised size chart isn’t dyslexia friendly as it stands. It uses a mix of numbers and letters that can be difficult for dyslexia sufferers to understand. Wilde Mode’s proposed chart design will include diagrams, images and videos to help consumers accurately take measurements. 

Made to measure designs are offered at Wilde Mode which means its important that customers are confident taking their own measurements in order to receive products that are comfortable and don’t dig in or irritate the wearer. 

Over 700 million people across the world have dyslexia. That is somewhere between 5-10% of the population. So why aren’t more things dyslexia friendly?  

(see left for example of standard size chart) 

Deborah is on the search to find a creative designer who can create and bring this idea to life and enter into 2022 with a dyslexia friendly size chart that all of her customers can understand around the world no matter their ability. 

Wilde Mode has a number of staff who have dyslexia so the team have found innovative ways to communicate when working in the studio. When the team encounter communication challenges, they have realised that one way the entire team will understand is drawing pictures to illustrate what they mean, which has become a Wilde Mode language. 

Deborah said “I’ve suffered from dyslexia my entire life which has been a challenge but I’ve found creative ways to communicate. I’ve shaped Wilde Mode into a brand that is very visual and extrovert because of this reason. Many of our customers have disabilities and I want to take action. Redesigning the standard sizing chart is one way I can help towards making more things accessible to dyslexia sufferers. ” 

Emma Grieshaber, seamstress and product developer said “When I was teaching at Wilde Mode, visual learning always worked best rather than words or written instruction. It was a way that everyone could understand so we shadowed the work of each other and learnt through putting the skills into practice. 

To learn more about Wilde Mode, please visit here!

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